Category Archive for: FIELD-EFFECT TRANSISTORS

expect

shown in Figure 7-3(a). This is as we would expect, since increasing the voltage across the fixed-resistance channel simply causes an Ohm’s law increase in the current through it. As we continue to increase VI)S, we find that noticeable depletion regions begin to form in the channel, as illustrated in Figure 7-3(b). Note that the…

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Junction Field-Effect Transistors

shown in Figure 7-3(a). This is as we would expect, since increasing the voltage across the fixed-resistance channel simply causes an Ohm’s law increase in the current through it. As we continue to increase VI)S, we find that noticeable depletion regions begin to form in the channel, as illustrated in Figure 7-3(b). Note that the…

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FIELD-EFFECT TRANSISTORS

INTRODUCTION The field-effect transistor (GET), like the bipolar. junction transistor, is a three- . terminal semiconductor device. However, the FER operates under principles completely different from those of the BET. A field-effect transistor is called a uni polar . device because the current through it results from the flow of only one of the two…

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INTEGRATED-CIRCUIT MOSFETs

By fur the greatest number of MOSFETs manufactured today arc in integrate circuit s. The enhancement-type MOSFET has a very simple structure (Figure 7-33) that makes its fabrication in a crystal substrate a straightforward and economics procedure. Furthermore, a very great number of devices can be fabricated in a single chip. Enhancement MOSFETs account for…

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VMOS AND DMOS TRANSISTORS

VMOS Transistors ~till another variation in MOS structure is called VMOS, which is used to produce both N-channel and P-channel enhancement MOSFETs. The name is derived from the appearance of the cross-sectional view (Figure 7-48), in which it can be seen . -shaped groove penetrates alternate Nan P layers. (In reality, the device i Corridor…

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